Field of Science

Connecticut Botanical Society Workshop

Saturday April 17, 2010 - 9:30am-12:30pm
Nature Center, 269 Oak Grove Street, Manchester, CT

I will be leading this workshop sponsored by the Connecticut Botanical Society next month. It is free and open to the public. Space is limited to 14 people, so if you are interested in attending please contact me.

Have you every walked through the woods to observe a carpet of mosses? Upon closer inspection you notice that there are a wide variety of patterns, shapes, and colors within such a small amount of space. In this session you will learn how to indentify and explore mosses. This introduction to mosses will be based upon properties that can be observed with a hand lens. Participants should wear sturdy shoes and dress for the weather. After the indoor introduction we will car pool to the field site (Bolton Notch State Park).  Coffee and light refreshments will be available at the start of the workshop.

Call or email Jessica Budke to register -  (860) 486-6306  jessica.budke@uconn.edu 

(Update 10 April 2010 - The Workshop is currently full. If you would like to be placed on the wait list feel free to contact me.)

5 comments:

  1. Hey Jessica,

    I sent you an email but i also wanted to ask you on here. This is Omesh again and I was wondering if you knew about any Liverworts near Uconn Storrs or near Simsbury, CT.

    Thanks

    ReplyDelete
  2. Omesh,
    You should be able to find a number of Liverworts near Simsbury, CT. You should look for a wet area. Something seepy that has standing water, near a creek, or just a moist spot in the woods. The mosses are more common than the liverworts so you may need to get down close on your hands an knees to find some. Do you have a hand lens or magnifying lens that you can use? Some liverworts are flat and strap shaped while mosses have leaves that whirl around the stem. You should check your bio book for a more detailed description or I would recommend Paul Davison's book to help with your identifications

    The other plant you are looking for I think is a Prothallus. This is not a moss but a fern gametophyte. Look for a small heart shaped plant growing with the mosses and liverworts. Look for open moist soil areas that have a cover of small plants. With all the rain we have had this sunny weekend should be a great time to find them and to enjoy exploring the outdoors.

    Happy hunting!

    ReplyDelete
  3. The link to Paul Davison's Book is

    http://www.blurb.com/bookstore/detail/422248

    I noticed it didn't show up on the other comment.

    ReplyDelete
  4. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete

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